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-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is al
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
30 million people out of poverty. when china joined they brought about 300 million people out poverty. that's been a big story. chinese savings in the world financial market were a part what drove the most recent about new welt wealth in the world. as brilliant a man as allen green span was unable to grasp the reality of our historical moment. it was in part due to that failure that somatic errorrers were made that lead to the meltdown in-housing crisis. in inadequate response, policy to what was really a change in financial market due to growth elsewhere in the world. in the next twenty to thirty years, 3 billion people are joining the global economy. it's going to be a transformation ten times what we have seen which was ten times what happened in japan. now if 3 billion people are suddenly given cognitive freedom, suddenly not thinking just moment to moment, day-to-day, in a existence but are creators, are collaborators, are new contributors, human beings are not just consumers. they are producers. and that's what this is about. it's the possibility that are created when that happe
don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited to share my thoughts with folks that work on policy issues mayor and the same thing in the united st
years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >> thank you for the softball question. [laughter] admiral mullen when he was at her graduation as chief of naval operations come he told us to speak truth to power. as a junior officer, not to follow unethical
approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did not see a lot of change from the bush and administration to the obama administration, the obama administration argued that the protection should not extend to the circuits, congress wanted to keep the courts out more than they have when they passed the military detention acts and everything else in 2006 and tried to correct for what they saw as the court trying to extend jurisdiction, they have established a line, i do not see they can't push back against that line and the battle lines that performed at this point. >> i basically agree with greg the obama administration continued, without any change whatsoever. and on the ground, on the question, with new detainee's, the legacy cases are not going anywhere. governor romney wo
the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about before that has grown up in 30 years comes out of the decisions made in the boardroom with the boards of directors and mothor shareholders about the profits. if the workers themseffeces distributed the profits collectively, would they give poor people $4s every body else says not enough? unlikely. the biggest
in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shanghai he obtained passports, documents of the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922. a first step in the development of international refugee
to buy back american from china. america, it's probably very clear to you right now your shortest path to true democracy is due north. when you go into that polling station this year, don't just check the box for most charming millionaire. consider a country you truly deserve, canada, and together, we can make a new america, but better. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you. >> awesome. >> handsome man. he's the average canadian. they did a computer photo thing and averaged all the canadians together, and this is the guy we got. >> there's hairy women in canada. >> i'll read a standard mortality table -- short section, section 3.2. this is about the citizens united decision. do i have to explain that to anybody? okay, good. stop putting politicians on layaway, and start buying them out right at the bed, bath, and beyond integrity. a quick fact before i introduce the chapter. before i get going, thank you, c-span for coming out and covering this. you guys are awesome. [applause] more programming like this, a little less council on foreign relations and bull shit. [
in the last couple years the rise of state capitalism in china and russia and a number other countries. so the question becomes, how on this global environment would be state capitalism vigorously against each other for resources and for market and cheap labor. how does one bring standards within that timeframe we talked about to the breaks. china is really behaving internationally no different than the united states, great britain behave in prior centuries. as you say, we are running out of time and running out of resources. the kind of renewal, political renewal were talking about really has to be global in order for this to work because the u.s. based corporations doesn't fall on the global economy. so i'm imagining, is this overthrowing the wto and allowing the environmental sky rise are things that produce products for national legislation, winding operations operations -- what is a delicate a handle on that? [inaudible] >> i have so many peered to her three years ago paul kildee wrote a book, arguing that exactly the kind of results in terms of movement will not happen in this countr
to keep avenues of adoption open for children from russia, from china, from romania, etc. people may be wondering, senator, you're so bold about speaking about this, do children from america, are children from america adopted overseas? the answer is yes. not many, but under the international treaties of the rights of the child to a family, we need to be open to have american children if they can't find an adoptive home here, to be able to go to other countries. but the most important thing is to know that americans step up every day to adopt american children, both infants, teenagers, and even i've known of adoptions of children that were 22 and 23 years old. when are you ever too old to need a mother and a father? but what the action that the russian duma has taken is -- it's a travesty and it's incomprehensible that any government could would take their anger out on another another country against the children of their own country. we hope they will reconsider. we hope the people of russia will rise up and tell their government absolutely not, take your anger out in another way, no
is an america needs offshoring. we have to offshore barack obama. he has to go. send him to china. >> first of all, what is . >> a vegas odds makers is someone who predistincts the winner of a sporting event. it was a natural outgrowth for me. to predicting the winner of political elections. and i think it was 2004, news max, the conservative website said out of all the odds makers and pollsters in america the one who got the most accurate prediction was wayne root. i predicted bush by three points and 35 electoral votes and he won by three votes and. i'm darn good. are you breaking these political odds down by county? >> i just look at people. i'm a people person. the same reason i've been predicting sporting event. i'm good at who has the edge based on situation historical or situational situations based on whether players are up or down. psychologically based on how they played last week and next week. i felt the same way about election. i know, four years ago i spoke to probably 1,000 i was a vice president nominee hundreds of small business people. i would say normally you think of sma
in china, a man without a country. so destitute that he made his way to shanghai in a mix of men and women's castoff clothing. in shanghai he obtained a passport, a document that the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees, initially russian, in 1922, a first dip in the development of international refugee law and policy, the international office of refugees would when that 1938 peace prize. a year and to rally members of the non bolshevik russian diaspore and wasted they could do something akin to lembergs inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a proudly tatterdemalion, go round the world alone by bicycle. luckily did not have to do that and departed shanghai on a battered second-hand bicycle been upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok in in a battered second-hand motorcycle in singapore. a benefactor gave him a brand new aerial motorcycle was a letter that guaranteed assistance. he think the worldwide services of the ymca, shell oil, and the firestone company and depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil, and fo
at the age of 85 who confronted the government of china in the organization's interest. and by 2007 their world summer olympic games were held in shanghai. shriver also advised the u.s. catholic bishops in drafting a letter on nuclear war issued in 1983, and he worked to influence the reagan administration to accept a no-first-strike approach to nuclear weapons. in 1993 president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bare bones account of sargent shriver's life and achievements suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man who was a devout catholic and an inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand the spirit and motivation of such a versatile and resilient man? striving to understand sergeant shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two-and-a-half or three feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world. and at the rounded bottom of the toy, there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, he springs back upright again. it's great fun if you're 2, but sargent shriver was like that his whole life. no matter how m
; either us going nuclear in the korean war against china or from the korean peninsula and south korea today being a communist state under north korea. i want to ask if gayle shisler is in the audience tonight. gayle shisler, correct me if i'm wrong, is the granddaughter of o.p. smith. raised by o.p. smith because your father was killed in the world war ii. so we have here today the granddaughter -- and raised by smith -- of a genuine american hero, is i'd like -- so i'd like to give you both a round of applause. la. [applause] >> and if there's one thing i hope comings out of this book is the marine corps museum corrects the notion even in the marine corps that chesney polar was commander at the reservoir. >> i'm so glad that you raise this because really, for those of you who haven't red -- read the book yet, this is far the most recognized and still gripping story. it's really telling a powerful story. now, is it true, tom, as you've just shown for us that you have a soft spot for the marines? [laughter] he has been accused of being partial to the marines at the expense of the army.
and china with a claim to encounter racism unparalleled. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equipment for grown men of the boy scouts. and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians them especially parsi's. i consequence of empire and a kind of counterweight to it. a different diaspora, and yet similar manifestations of internationalism supported -- this is in the clutches of circumnavigators. this internationalism supported him on his later circus to of the worker he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during the country's revolution. as a white russian, soboleff was a man without a country. so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland in a mix of men and women cast off clothing. in shanghai he obtained a passport, a document that the league of nations had begun to issue the stateless refugees in 1922. a first in the development of international refugee law and policy. soboleff yearned to rally members of the non-bolshevik russian diaspora and he wished russians to do
come here from haiti, somalia, china, mexico, in calista's case her grandparents came from switzerland and poland, in my case they came from places like scotland and ireland. you can come from anywhere, and you can learn to be an american. but to do that, the you have to learn to be an american. and if you have an academic elite and a news media elite and an entertainment elite who are opposed to teaching you how to be american, you cut off the life blood of this country. that's why we have an american legacy tour. now, several people said when they found out i was coming out here that if i'm going to come out here and talk about george washington, which to a lot of people seems a long way off, and i talk about sweet land of liberty and land of pilgrim's pride, both of callista's books have become bestsellers, it's actually about the 13 controlnies. her mother, who's now 80, wrote her and said you should not say this is for 4-8 years old, this is for 4-80 years old because nobody has studied the colonies and, therefore, it's brand new information for everybody. somebody said to me, oka
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17